ESA invites the international press for a last glimpse at the LISAPathfinder satellite before its voyage to Kourou

Slated for launch by Vega in November, ESA’s gravitational-wave detection technology demonstrator is ready to begin launch preparations in September at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Members of the media are invited to join ESA and Airbus Defence and Space at IABG’s space test centre in Ottobrunn, near Munich, Germany, to get a final glimpse of LISA Pathfinder before it departs to the launch site.

LISA Pathfinder will help to open up a completely new observational window into the gravitational Universe, proving new technologies needed to measure gravitational waves in space. Predicted by Albert Einstein, these waves are ripples in the curvature of spacetime and are produced by massive celestial bodies. Understanding their signature will tell scientists a lot about black holes, compact double stars and other exotic objects.

Members of the media are invited to join ESA’s, Airbus DS and relevant LISA Pathfinder scientists and partners on Tuesday, 1 September from 11:00 CEST, at the IABG space test centre in Ottobrunn near Munich, Germany.

To suscribe and know more, see this page : http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Call_for_Media_LISA_Pathfinder_leaving_for_launch_site

 

ESA press release: LISAPathfinder prepares for final exams

The summer is coming and that means students across Europe are sitting their final tests. ESA’s LISAPathfinder, a technology demonstrator that will pave the way for space-based gravitational wave observaotires, is no different. It is currently in the test centre at IABG, Ottobrunn, Germany. …

Read the ESA Press release

 The LISA Pathfinder science module pictured in a cleanroom at IABG, Ottobrunn, Germany, in June 2015. One of two (gold coloured) colloidal micro-Newton thrusters, part of the NASA provided Space Technology 7 mission, can be seen on the side of the spacecraft.

The LISA Pathfinder science module pictured in a cleanroom at IABG, Ottobrunn, Germany, in June 2015. One of two (gold coloured) colloidal micro-Newton thrusters, part of the NASA provided Space Technology 7 mission, can be seen on the side of the spacecraft. © ESA – P. McNamara

 

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